Thursday, May 16, 2019

State’s Second Deadliest Tornado Hit Fort Smith in 1898

Photo of wreckage from the 1898 tornado in Fort Smith,
courtesy of the Arkansas State Archives.




Arkansas has a long history of natural disasters, including tornadoes. One of Arkansas’s most destructive tornadoes hit Fort Smith on Jan. 11, 1898.

The first few weeks of January in Fort Smith had been unusually warm and balmy with storms each evening. When another storm started on the evening of Jan. 11, it wasn’t initially alarming. However, around 11 o’clock, a tornado formed in Oklahoma, just west of the city, and headed east, picking up power as it went. The tornado entered Arkansas and first struck Fort Smith’s National Cemetery, leaving a 100-yard-wide path of destruction. It ripped trees from the ground – scattering them like toothpicks –and threw heavy, stone cemetery markers. The storm flattened the cemetery’s 5-foot stone wall, according to a newspaper report.

As the tornado approached the main part of town, it grew even larger and more powerful. Marble sized hail pounded the city, damaging roofs and smashing windows. By the time the tornado entered the city proper, at 11:15 p.m., the streets and sidewalks were covered with broken glass.

The first victim of the tornado was George Carter, a fireman for the city’s Grand Opera House. As he watched the approaching storm from his home on Garrison Avenue, the tornado blew in his window sending a pane of sharp glass through his torso and killing him instantly. The tornado then ripped his house apart.

Tracking eastward, the tornado ripped the roof off of Fagan Bourland’s store on Sixth Street, then proceeded to destroy Lunsford’s Blacksmith shop and a boarding house named The National House. The federal court in Fort Smith was in session that week, and hotels and boarding houses were full. Many people were asleep, but residents of the National House heard the approaching storm and escaped the building.

Other visitors were not so lucky. As the tornado crossed Sixth Street, it destroyed Mrs. Burgess’ boarding house, where 25 people were sleeping unaware of the danger. The tornado destroyed the house, killing three women and leaving other residents trapped under the rubble.

The force of wind was staggering. The bell in the steeple of the Baptist church was blown 100 feet as the tornado razed the building. The city’s high school, completed only a few months earlier and not yet insured, was gutted and destroyed. The school’s roof was blown onto Dr. W.T. Cate’s house, which destroyed the house and left Dr. Cate trapped inside.

The tornado then made its way through the most densely populated parts of the city, leaving death and massive injuries in its wake. Electric poles were snapped, and gas lines ruptured. Many of the buildings left standing in the tornado’s wake caught fire, including a block of buildings on Garrison Avenue. Will Lawson, a resident in one of those buildings, said his wife died in his arms. He was unable to get her body out of the ruins.

The tornado had knocked down telephone lines, which complicated rescue efforts by making it harder for rescue workers to communicate. To prevent igniting more fires, power to downtown Fort Smith was turned off, but that left rescuers in complete darkness as they searched for survivors. As the fire spread, the Fort Smith Fire Department rushed toward the disaster, only to be impeded by debris.
Heavy rain pelted survivors in the wake of the tornado. The injured searched for shelter amid piles of rubble and brick. Doctors created makeshift hospitals in buildings that remained standing. St. John’s and Charity Hospitals opened its doors to anyone who needed help.

Bob Hirschberg and his son worked with several other rescuers to save those trapped in the buildings near the high school. They were able to dig out 17 survivors from the wreckage.

Fort Smith Fire Department Capt. J.J. Little sent an ominous and concise message to the Birnie Brothers Funeral Home: “Come down and take care of the dead.” Some of the dead were taken to the city morgue, where the city coroner ordered the doors to the morgue be kept open for townspeople searching for lost loved ones.

As the people of Fort Smith gathered the next morning to assess the damage, it became clear hundreds of people were now homeless and more than 100 were injured. The death toll quickly rose to 50, but several more people succumbed to their injuries in the next few weeks, raising the death toll to 55. The 1898 tornado remains the second deadliest tornado on record to hit Arkansas.

The tornado also hurt the city economically. The loss of businesses meant many residents were now unemployed. Further, many of the destroyed buildings and businesses were not insured, which would make rebuilding difficult. According to newspaper reports from the time, the tornado lasted for only 4 minutes, but in that time, it did about $1 million in damage. Adjusted for inflation, that amount would equal about $30 million today.

Miraculously, residents quickly picked themselves up and rebuilt Fort Smith. Within days, the city raised thousands of dollars in pledged aid from its residents. In just two years, as the 20th century dawned, most of the scars left by the storm were gone.

For more information on the history of Fort Smith or Arkansas, visit the Arkansas State Archives at 1 Capitol Mall, Suite 215, or call 501-682-6900. Information is also available online at http://archives.arkansas.gov/.

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Wednesday’s Wonderful Collection - Millar-Mauney papers, SMC.0004.0007


Millard M. Mauney owned forty acres of diamond-bearing land outside Murfreesboro, Arkansas, and refused offers to sell after the first diamonds were discovered in 1906 on an adjoining property. He sold thirty acres to Horace Bemis, leasing the remaining ten acres to the Kimberlite Company, consisting of Austin Q. Millar, his son Howard A. Millar, and W.L. Wilder as trustees. After Bemis died, his heirs sold their land to the Millars, who tried to buy Mauney's land. Mauney staunchly refused, even trying to buy back the land the Millars bought from Bemis. An act of arson destroyed the Millar operation in 1919. They were never able to recover from the loss.
This collection includes correspondence from Howard A. Millar, Consulting Mining Engineer, to the M.M. Mauney estate, reporting diamonds found on the leased Mauney land.

·         1915 April 24: Howard A. Millar, et al., Murfreesboro, Arkansas, to M.M. Mauney estate, Murfreesboro, Arkansas
·         1915 October 11: Howard A. Millar, et al., Murfreesboro, Arkansas, to M.M. Mauney estate, Murfreesboro, Arkansas
·         1916 February 9: Howard A. Millar, et al., Murfreesboro, Arkansas, to M.M. Mauney estate, Murfreesboro, Arkansas
·         1916 June 1: Howard A. Millar, et al., Murfreesboro, Arkansas, to M.M. Mauney estate, Murfreesboro, Arkansas
·         1916 August 28: Howard A. Millar, et al., Murfreesboro, Arkansas, to M.M. Mauney estate, Murfreesboro, Arkansas
·         1918 June 25: Howard A. Millar, et al., Murfreesboro, Arkansas, to M.M. Mauney estate, Murfreesboro, Arkansas
·         1918 November 11: Howard A. Millar, et al., Murfreesboro, Arkansas, to M.M. Mauney estate, Murfreesboro, Arkansas

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Wednesday’s Wonderful Collection - John Henry Roberson and family papers, MG.00469

John Henry Roberson was known to baseball fans as "Rube Robinson." Roberson was born August 16, 1889 in Floyd, White County, Arkansas. He was labeled "Rube Robinson" by the press. According to the Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame, "His baseball career as a pitcher covered 22 years. He signed his first professional contract in 1908 and reached the major leagues with Pittsburgh in 1911. He won 40 games for the Pirates and Cardinals in 1912-15. He joined the New York Yankees for one year and later pitched for Little Rock in 1916-17 and 1919-27, winning 26 games in 1920 and 1922. He spent part of 1923 on loan to New Orleans and was with the Arkansas Travelers part of 1928. He retired after the 1929 season with Atlanta. He had a career record of 304-222."
Roberson married Dorothy Lee Latture on December 28, 1912. She worked for the School Instruction Association which later became the Parent Teacher Association. Dorothy and John Henry had one son Fred O. Roberson. Fred and his wife Marie had two children, Gloria and Fred O., Jr.
After baseball, J.H. Roberson worked for Pulaski County and the Arkansas State Highway Department, retiring in 1959. Roberson often tutored children from the Riverside Community House on playing baseball, and in 1962 he was inducted into the Arkansas Hall of Fame. J.H. Roberson died in July 1965, in Little Rock, Arkansas.

This collection contains four scrapbooks and other material related to John Henry "Rube Robinson" Roberson's baseball career, and two scrapbooks related to Dorothy (Mrs. John Henry) Roberson's career with the Parent Teacher Association and her work as an assistant probation officer.
·         Scrapbook I, John Henry Roberson, 1911-1991
·         Call for military service, 1917
·         J.H. Roberson business cards, 1925 and undated
·         Income tax return, 1920-1925
·         Player contracts, 1918 and 1925
·         Correspondence of J.H. Roberson, 1922-1965
·         Scrapbook II, John Henry Roberson, undated
·         Missouri Pacific Station (the Railroad World Series), 1929 and undated
·         Scrapbook III, John Henry Roberson's best baseball years, 1917-1929
·         Newsclippings, 1954-1958
·         Arkansas State Highway Department, 1953-1959
·         Speech of Arkansas Hall of Fame banquet, 1962
·         Arkansas Hall of Fame program, John Henry Roberson, 1962 January 18
·         Arkansas Hall of Fame program, 1964 January 23
·         Life insurance, 1929
·         Scrapbook IV, John Henry Roberson, 1928-1966
·         Scrapbook V, Dorothy Latture Roberson newspaper clippings of the family, 1908-1962
·         Postcard, 1967
·         Parent Teacher Association newsclippings, undated
·         Scrapbook VI, Dorothy Latture Roberson, Pulaski County Assistant Probation Officer, and photographs, 1950-1967

Monday, May 6, 2019

Impassioned Speech Led to African American Voting Rights


Photo of Mr. William H. Grey, courtesy of
the Persistence of the Spirit Collection
at the Arkansas State Archives.
At the end of the Civil War, the nation was confronted with the question of how to readmit Southern states into the Union. This long process of answering that question and reintegrating the South was called Reconstruction.

Reconstruction pitted those who wished the South to be readmitted with little change to their pre-war political structure against those who hoped the process would bring lasting change. In Arkansas, those differing forces came to a head in 1868.

Arkansas began Reconstruction in 1863, after the capture of Little Rock by Union forces. In 1864, Arkansans met in a convention to ratify a new constitution. Other than the abolishment of slavery, the new constitution made few changes from the state’s pre-war constitution. One of the most striking parts of the new constitution was it extended voting rights only to white men, which left out the possibility of African American voting rights.

The U.S. Congress took control of Reconstruction in 1867, after the impeachment of U.S. President Andrew Johnson, and stringently demanded more political change in the South. Lawmakers, led by Thaddeus Stevens of Pennsylvania and Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, required Southern states to write new state constitutions extending voting rights to African Americans. Seventy delegates met in Little Rock to write a new constitution in January 1868. Among those delegates was William H. Grey of Helena, Arkansas.

Grey was born to free African American parents in 1829 in Washington, D.C. In the 1850s, he worked as a servant in the house of Virginia Gov. Henry A. Wise. Wise often took Grey to the Capitol, where Grey undoubtedly learned the art of politics.

After Gen. Sterling Price captured Little Rock in 1863, Grey moved to Helena where he established a farm, practiced law and became a minister in a Helena church. Grey became involved in the Republican Party and quickly became one of its leaders.

In 1867, Grey became a delegate to Arkansas’s constitutional convention and was the leading African American voice in the convention. Among the eight African American delegates at the convention, six had been born slaves, which made their presence in the convention all the more poignant.

On the other side of the political aisle was a group of men, many of whom were Confederate veterans who were opposed to a number of the Republican-backed laws. They were led by Jesse N. Cypert, a Confederate veteran from White County who had been a delegate to the 1864 Constitutional Convention and the Secession Convention in 1861.

As the convention progressed through the winter of 1868, it became clear that one of the major issues was voting rights. Grey’s camp was intent on excluding Arkansas’s former Confederate government officers and politicians from the voting rolls, while including African Americans on those rolls. Cypert’s faction called for voting rights to be extended to white men only.  

Days after the opening of the convention, Cypert demanded the formal acceptance of the already established 1864 Constitution. To do otherwise, he asserted, would be to abolish “white man’s government of our fathers, and an erection of an Africanized government in its stead.”  Cypert proposed an ordinance to accept the 1864 Constitution and end the convention.

Grey, the de facto leader of African American delegates in the convention, denounced Cypert’s ordinance. Grey began his address by expressing shock that Cypert would offer such an ordinance. “Now, sir, who having stood by the government and the old flag in times of trouble,” he continued, “for this and other considerations we are here not to ask charity at the hands of the honorable body, but to receive, at the hands of the people of Arkansas in convention assembled, the proportionment of our rights… I am here, sir, to see those rights of citizenship engrafted in the organic law of this state.”
Grey argued equal rights were owed to African Americans. “We are here, sir, to receive the amount due us as citizens of the United States and the State of Arkansas, and we are content,” Grey said.  His speech, which was successful, was possibly the first time an African American voice was heard in Arkansas politics.

On Jan. 17, the convention rejected Cypert’s ordinance by a vote of 53 to 10. Following the rejection of Cypert’s ordinance, the convention passed a new constitution. The Constitution of 1868 was a revolutionary document that allowed African American men the right to vote.

After the convention, Grey remained in public life, serving as Commissioner of Immigration and State Lands and later as an assistant U.S. assessor. He died in Helena in 1888, leaving a lasting mark on Arkansas politics with his impassioned speech on behalf of African American voting rights.

For more information about Arkansas history, visit the Arkansas State Archives at 1 Capitol Mall, Suite 215, or call 501-682-6900. Information is also available at http://archives.arkansas.gov/.

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Officers Elected for ASA Commissions

Top, right to left: AHC Chairman Jason Hendren and Vice Chairman Dr. Micheal Tarver
Bottom: BHCA Chairwoman Carla Coleman and Vice Chairman Dr. Jesse Hargrove


The Arkansas State Archives is pleased to announce the 2019 elected officers for the Black History Commission of Arkansas and the Arkansas History Commission.

Carla Coleman, of Little Rock, and Jason Hendren, of Bentonville, were reelected by their peers to serve in chair positions for the Black History Commission and History Commission, respectively. Dr. Micheal Tarver, of Clarksville, is the new vice-chairman of the History Commission, and Dr. Jesse Hargrove, of Alexander, is the new vice-chairman of the Black History Commission.

The Arkansas History Commission is administered by a seven-member board appointed by the governor with the approval of the state senate. The commission reviews Arkansas State Archives projects and expenditures quarterly. Besides Hendren and Tarver, members are: Jimmy Bryant, of Conway; Mary Dillard, of Malvern; Ronald Ruller, of Little Rock; Robert McCarley, of Little Rock; and Rod Soubers, of Mountain Home.

The Black History Commission works to promote, preserve and memorialize the contributions and impact of African American Arkansans. Besides Hargrove and Coleman, commissioners are: Patricia Johnson, of Pocahontas; Rev. Frank H. Stewart, of Conway; Elise Hampton, of Conway; Myron Jackson, of Little Rock; and Dr. Cherrise Jones Branch, of Jonesboro.

Coleman was appointed to the Black History Commission in 2004. She was first elected chairwoman in 2008. Hendren was appointed to the History Commission in 2017 and was elected chairman last year. Drs. Hargrove and Tarver both were appointed to their respective commissions last year.

The officers were elected to their positions during regular meetings earlier this year.

The public is welcome to attend commission meetings. The Black History Commission will meet next at noon, Thursday, May 9, in the Heritage Room of the Department of Arkansas Heritage at 1100 North St. in Little Rock. The History Commission will meet at 10 a.m. Thursday, May 30, at the Powhatan Historic State Park at 4414 Highway 25.


Wednesday’s Wonderful Collection - Anita Turner papers, MS.000221

Anita Ellen Turner was born in Paragould, Arkansas, on June 26, 1896. Her brother, William Howard A. Turner, was born on August 2, 1900. Their mother, Laura Abner, died December 1957. Anita E. Turner held offices in such organizations as the Arkansas Pioneer Branch of the National League of American Pen Women, Arkansas Authors' and Composers' Society, and others. She taught piano and voice. She died July 1, 1982, in Little Rock, Arkansas.
The collection contains correspondence, yearbooks, news clippings, programs, and material pertaining to the organizations in which Anita E. Turner participated.
·         Correspondence
o    1. 1937 February 28: J.R. O'Neal, Saint Louis, Missouri, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas (Box 1)
o    2. 1947 December 20: Bernie Babcock, Little Rock, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    3. 1952 September 2: Sam Strauss, President, Pfeifers of Arkansas, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock
o    4. 1952 September 30: Mrs. Walsh and family to Abner and daughters
o    5. 1954 March 11: Gladys and Claude Schlanger baby announcement
o    6. 1954 August 27: Anita E. Turner, President, Arkansas Authors' and Composers' Society, Little Rock, Arkansas, to "Dear fellow member"
o    7. 1955 February 8: Postcard, "J" to Anita Ellen Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    8. 1955 May 17: Postcard, Gladys and William Turner, Colorado Springs, Colorado, to Mrs. L.B. Abner and Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    9. 1956 December 17: Gladys W. Grone to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    10. 1957 December 9: Billy Joette and Sheryl Turner, Mission, Kansas, to Mrs. L.B. Abner and Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    11. 1957 December 14: Francille, Memphis, Tennessee, to Anita and William Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    12. 1957 December 16: Carolyn Ann to Anita E. Turner and Mrs. William H.A. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    13. 1957 December 16: Mary and Gene Martin, Colorado Springs, Colorado, to William H.A. Turner, Kansas City, Missouri
o    14. 1957 December 16: Eric, St. Louis, Missouri, to Anita and William H.A. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    15. 1957 December 18: Doctor and Mrs. Ellery Gay, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    16. 1957 December 19: Clifford C. Hahne, Saint Louis, Missouri, to William H.A. Turner, Kansas City, Missouri
o    17. 1957 December 19: Ray Maxwell, Saint Louis, Missouri, to William H.A. Turner, Kansas City, Missouri
o    18. 1957 December 19: R.H. Werner, Yorktown Heights, New York, to William H.A. Turner, Kansas City, Missouri
o    19. 1957 December 22: Beulah, Covington, Virginia, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    20. 1957 December 31: Myra Carithers, Secretary, First Christian Church, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    21. 1958 January 2: Horace and Florence Booker, Indian Rocks Beach, Florida, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    22. 1958 January 3: Myra Carithers to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    23. 1958 January 4: Sophie Mark, Detroit, Michigan, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    24. 1958 January 6: Mrs. E.G. Poindexter to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    25. 1958 January 8: David Barton Clapp, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    26. 1958 February 1: Eula J. Spivey, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    27. 1959 November 30: Postcard, Glad and William to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    28. 1960 December 5: Postcard, "Beulah" to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    29. 1962 February 5: William H.A. Turner, Kansas City, Missouri, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    30. 1962 April 25: Postcard, "J", at the Grand Canyon, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    31. 1965 August 19, Postcard, from Ireland, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    32. 1965 August 31: Glad and William Turner to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    33. 1966 April 21: Postcard, Gladys and Claude, Paris, France, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    34. 1966 November 8: Postcard, Eric, Rolla, Missouri, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    35. 1968 March 9: Lily Peter, Marvell, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    36. 1968 August 17: Dula H. Reid, Conway, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    37. 1968 October 21: Etta C. Harris, Hamburg, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    38. 1969 January 8: Governor Winthrop Rockefeller, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    39. 1969 January 14, Maxine Fortenberry, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    40. 1969 December 19: Anna King Davis, Salem, Arkansas, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    41. 1970 February 5: Lily Peter, Marvell, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    42. 1970 March 4: Mary Hamby, secretary to Mrs. Winthrop Rockefeller, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    43. 1970 March 13: Georgia McDonald, Memphis, Tennessee, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    44. 1970 April 2: Alice Gray to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    45. 1970 April 3: May Smith White, Monroe, Louisiana, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    46. 1970 April 6: Georgia McDonald, Memphis, Tennessee, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    47. 1970 April 8: Betty Gene to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    48. 1970 April 12, Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Mrs. Winthrop Rockefeller, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    49. 1970 May 18: Emogean Cameron, Charleston, Arkansas, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    50. 1970 August 24: Margaret Garton, Washington, District of Columbia, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    51. 1971 February 26: Postcard, Chloe Wren to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    53. 1972 May 3: "Old Buler" to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    52. 1971 October 8: Postcard, from "J" to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    54. 1972 July 22: William P. Campbell, Searcy, Arkansas, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    55. 1973 January 30: John B. Jacobs, Clarendon, Arkansas, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    56. 1973 March 17: Invitation, fiftieth wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. William H.A. Turner
o    57. 1973 September 1: Marguerite C. Williams, Hot Springs, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    59. 1975 February 7: Cheryl to "Neat"
o    58. 1973 December 20: Eunice to [?]
o    60. 1975 March 10: William H.A. Turner to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    61. 1975 March 17: William and Glad Turner, Harrisonville, Missouri, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    62. 1975 March 24: William H.A. Turner, Harrisonville, Missouri, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    63. 1976 November 7: Peggy Vining to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    64. 1977 January 4: William H.A. Turner, Kansas City, Missouri, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    65. 1977 March 27: Haco Boyd, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita Turner and LaNell Compton, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    66. 1977 April 5: William A. Turner, Kansas City, Missouri, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    67. 1977 June 22: C.E. Cardwell and Imogene Cardwell to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    68. 1977 October 18: Georgia to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    69. 1977 December 21: Pauline to Anita E. Turner
o    70. 1977 December 22: Frances Neal, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    71. 1978 January 9: Glad Turner, Kansas City, Missouri, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    72. 1978 March 21: Frances Neal, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    73. 1978 April 22: Barbara Mulkey to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    74. 1978 July 22: Cary and Shawn Chestnut, Hobart, Oklahoma, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    75. 1979 August 30: Invitation to Arkansas State Library reception for LaNell Compton
o    76. 1979 September 15: LaNell Compton, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    77. 1980 February 29: Sue and Aubrey Laumin, Shreveport, Louisiana, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    78. 1980 April 11: Mary Lincoln, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    79. 1980 June 14: Marilyn to "Dear Nini"
o    80. 1980 July 26: Wedding announcement, Madeline Rue Ross and Jerome Howard Schlanger
o    81. 1980 October 24: Melody Curtis, Mabelvale, Arkansas, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    82. 1981 May 2: Wedding announcement, Kristine Erika Werner and Scott Sven Sunden
o    83. 1981 May 2: Invitation to a gathering at Deer Hill, Wappingers Falls, New York
o    84. 1981 May 9: Graduation invitation, Marla Turner
o    85. 1981 July 3: Scott and Kristi Sunden, Harrington Park, New Jersey, to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    86. 1981 July 3: Postcard, [?] to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    87. 1981 September 14: Marge to Anita
o    88. 1981 October 12: Virginia Evansen, Mountain Home, Arkansas, to Anita
o    89. 1982 January 21: Beulah Mitchell, Covington, Virginia, to Anita
o    90. 1982 April 21: Verna Lee Hinegardner, National Federation of State Poetry Societies, Incorporated, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    91. 1982 May 18: Beulah to Anita
o    92. 1982 June 5: Glad Turner, Kansas City, Missouri, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    93. 1982 June 25: [?], Chesterfield, Missouri, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    94. 1982 July: LaNell Compton to Anita Turner's friends
o    95. 1982 August 4: Mollie Mealing, Columbus, Georgia, to the family of Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    96. 1983 March 19: Gordon Honda, Bensky Furs, Little Rock, Arkansas, to LaNell Compton
o    97. 1987 May 7: Gladys S. Miller, Doylestown, Pennsylvania, to Anita E. Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    98. Undated: [?] to LaNell Compton (Box 2)
o    99. Undated: Robert A. to Anita E. Turner
o    100. Undated: [?] Bass to Anita
o    101. Undated: [?] to Anita E. Turner
o    102. Undated: Kate Howard to Anita
o    103. Undated: Leona to Anita E. Turner
o    104. Undated: Lona Marion to Miss Turner
o    105. Undated: Mrs. Poindexter to Anita Turner, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    106. Undated: [?] to "Neat"
o    107. Undated: [?] to Anita E. Turner
o    108. Undated: [?] Compton to [?]
o    109. Undated: Joe and Cleo Russell to [?]
o    110. Undated: Laura Turner Abner family to [?]
o    111. Undated: Postcards
o    112. [?] January 8: "Glad" to "Nita"
o    113. [?] January 10: "Glad" to Anita E. Turner
o    114. [?] April 8: "Glad" to "Nita"
o    115. [?] June 21: "Glad" to "Nita" Turner
o    116. [?] November 24: Glad Turner, Kansas City, Missouri, to Anita Turner and LaNell Compton, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    117. [?] December 24: [?] to Anita Turner and LaNell Compton
o    118. Birthday cards
o    119. Christmas cards
o    120. Christmas cards
o    121. Christmas greetings from Arkansas Library Commission staff
o    122. Easter cards
o    123. Sympathy cards
o    124. Thanksgiving card
o    125. 1978: Valentine card
·         Miscellaneous
o    126. Undated: Announcement, Doctor Margaret Moore Jacobs' new book, "My Master Has A Garden"
o    127. Arkansas Authors', Composers', and Artists' Society material
o    128. 1983 February 17: Bank statement, Anita E. Turner, deceased
o    129. Church programs
o    130. Undated: Dried flowers from Pen Women's Press luncheon
o    131. Florist's tag for funeral flowers to Turner family
o    132. 1900 April 29: Funeral notice, Ella Elliott, Humboldt, Tennessee
o    133. Literature contest rules, University of Missouri Press, Columbia, Missouri
o    134. 1974-1982: Little Rock Musical Coterie material
o    135. 1981 November 6: Luncheon guest list of Alice Leigh
o    136. Manuscript, "For Ever Mine" by Anita E. Turner
o    137. Map, hand-drawn guide to 620 North Oak
o    138. Undated: Miscellaneous notes
o    139. 1952-1983: Miscellaneous programs and invitations
o    140. 1951-1979: Music programs
·         Printed material
o    141. National League of American Pen Women (Box 3)
o    142. Undated: Newsclipping photocopy, "A First Lady of Arkansas," Stella Payne Crow
o    143. Newsclippings
o    144. Newsclippings
o    145. Envelope, "Authors and Composers and Josie Frazee Cappleman"
o    146. 1954 March 28: Program for Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical, and Normal College choir concert
o    147. Program for opera, "Aida"
o    148. Program for opera, "Othello"
o    149. Program, Presidents Day, Arkansas Centennial celebration
o    150. 1980 May: Publication, Arkansas Orchestra Society, "Notes"
o    151. 1955 April: Publication, Minnesota Mining, and Manufacturing Company, "3M Megaphone"
o    152. 1965 December and 1967 December: Publication, National League of American Pen Women, "The Sign Board"
o    153. 1954 January and March: Publication, "Words and Music"
o    154. Sheet music, "Moods and Tenses" by Mabel Bean
o    155. Publication, "The Writer," Arkansas Authors' and Composers' Society
o    156. Sheet music, "Someday, Somewhere" by Mabel Bean
o    157. Sheet music, 'For Rent-A Heart" by Stella Payne Crow
o    158. Sheet music, "I Cling to You" by Stella Payne Crow
o    159. Sheet music, "Melissa" by Stella Payne Crow
o    160. Sheet music, "Oh Tell Me Little Star" by Stella Payne Crow
o    161. Sheet music, "The Ozarks Are Calling" by Stella Payne Crow
o    162. Sheet music, "Pamela" by Stella Payne Crow
o    163. Sheet music, "Maytime in the Ozarks" by Grace Speer Flickinger
o    164. Sheet music, "Song for Gigi" by Stella Payne Crow
o    165. Sheet music, "What Is Love" by Mrs. N.B. McArthur
o    166. Sheet music, "His Glory Shines Through" by J.B. Martin
o    167. Sheet music, "Hills in the Springtime" by Alma Colgan Schmitt
o    168. Sheet music, "Hold Me Close (Sweetheart)" by Madeline Syrcher
o    169. Tract, "The Star of Hope" by Anita E. Turner and Horace Booker
o    170. Typescript of a play by Bernie Babcock
o    171. Undated: Typescript by Anita E. Turner
o    172. Undated: Wedding invitation, Jerelene Mitchell and William Richard Garcia
o    173. 1963-1970: Woman's City Club/Greater Little Rock Federation of Women's Clubs
o    174. 1945 May 1: Woman's City Club, Incorporated, certificate of stock, Anita E. Turner
o    175. 1964-1966: Yearbook, Arkansas Pioneer Branch, National League of American Pen Women
o    176. 1968-1970: Yearbook, Arkansas Pioneer Branch, National League of American Pen Women
o    177. 1970-1972: Yearbook, Arkansas Pioneer Branch, National League of American Pen Women
o    178. 1972-1974: Yearbook, Arkansas Pioneer Branch, National League of American Pen Women
o    179. 1976-1978: Yearbook, Arkansas Pioneer Branch, National League of American Pen Women
o    180. 1978-1979: Yearbook, Arkansas Pioneer Branch, National League of American Pen Women
o    181. 1980-1982: Yearbook, Arkansas Pioneer Branch, League of American Pen Women
o    182. 1964-1974: Miscellaneous yearbooks
o    183. Printed napkins from receptions (Box 4)
o    184. 1956 May 25: Program, Arkansas Authors' and Composers' annual awards luncheon
o    185. 1875: Book, "Patterson's speller and analyzer adapted to written lessons, and accompanied by an exercise book," New York, Sheldon and Company
o    186. 1957 December 14: Memorial record book, Laura Turner Abner
o    187. 1957-1958: Book, "Sterling 8 column book," Arkansas Pioneer Branch, National League of American Pen Women, Anita E. Turner, treasurer
o    188. Arkansas Gazette, volume 132, number 152 (1951), "Thousands roar welcome as MacArthur reaches America"
o    189. Undated: Poetry, "The Ballad of the Pilgrim Cat"
o    190. Undated: Wedding announcement, "Miss Sibold and Mr. Garcia are married"
o    191. 1967 November 19: Arkansas Democrat Magazine, "Family history links Arkansas to old castle" by Gladys Alexander
o    192. 1952 June 22: Arkansas Democrat Magazine
o    193. "Bernie Babcock made notable contributions to literature-and history" by her granddaughter
o    194. "Social scene. Press honored with luncheon" by Mardi Epes
o    195. List of names/addresses removed from guest book
o    196. "Bill of Rights," with compliments of General Life Insurance Company of Arkansas
o    197. Miscellaneous