Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Wednesday's Wonderful Collection - Arkansas Political Memorabilia collection, SMC.0171.0002

Sheffield Nelson was the chairman of the Arkansas Republican Party from 1990-1992; during Governor Mike Huckabee’s tenure, Nelson was a member of the United States Commission on Civil Rights and the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. Nelson challenged William Clinton for the governor’s seat in 1990 but lost the race.

Winston Bryant served one term as the Secretary of State from 1977-1978, was Lieutenant Governor from 1981-1991, and attorney general from 1991-1999. While serving as Arkansas Attorney General, Winston Bryant ran for United States Senate seat in 1996 and 1998. He lost both races.

This collection houses political memorabilia from the 1990 Arkansas Governor’s race, a photograph of Winston Bryant, campaign material from Bryant, an interview with Clinton, and a copy of the Arkansas Outlook.

Donated by Steve Schafer, 2006.

Arkansas Political Memorabilia collection, Arkansas State Archives, Little Rock, Arkansas.
·         Bryant, Winston
o    Bumper sticker
o    Pamphlet for U.S. Senate, 1996
o    PH.ArkPoliticalMemor.01: Winston Bryant headshot. Black and white. 1996.
·         Clinton, William
o    Bumper sticker
o    Interview of William Clinton, 1990
o    Negative propaganda against Clinton
o    Rack card: Clinton for Governor, 1990
·         Nelson, Sheffield
o    Bumper sticker
o    Pamphlet for Governor, 1990
o    Postive propaganda for Sheffield Nelson
o    Publication: "The Nelson Update", 1990 August; 1990 September
o    Sheffield Nelson's stance on issues
·         Publication
o    Arkansas Outlook: 1990 September, Vol. 29, No. 4
o    "Clinton or Nelson?", Arkansas Democrat, 1990 October 21

Friday, October 13, 2017

Black History Commission of Arkansas announces quarterly meeting

The Black History Commission of Arkansas will hold a regular, quarterly meeting on Thurs., Nov. 2, 2017, at noon in the Arkansas State Archives conference room, located on the 2nd floor of the Multi-Agency Complex at One Capitol Mall, Little Rock, Arkansas.  This meeting is open to the public.
 
The Black History Commission of Arkansas is an advisory body to the Arkansas State Archives charged with preserving the history of black Arkansans and promoting the teaching of black history in Arkansas’s schools.

The Arkansas State Archives is a division of the Department of Arkansas Heritage and is responsible for collecting and maintaining the largest collection of historical materials on Arkansas in the world.  The State Archives has two branch locations; the Northeast Arkansas Regional Archives is located in Powhatan and the Southwest Arkansas Regional Archives is located in Washington.

Other divisions of the Department of Arkansas Heritage include the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, and the Historic Arkansas Museum.

For questions and comments, please contact the Arkansas State Archives at 501-682-6900.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Electronic Records Care: Summary



Will your favorite pics of your kid’s birthday last as long as your grandparents’ wedding photographs?

How do you store your family’s important records? How about your favorite family photos? Though physical photo albums and file folders still probably exist for older materials, it’s increasingly likely that your recent documents and photographs are being created and stored electronically rather than in physical formats, and the shift to the convenience of electronic documents and digital photography brings up a number of new challenges when it comes to preserving your family’s history.

It may surprise you to know that long-term preservation of digital information requires more ongoing attention than paper documents or photographs. Removable media (such as floppy disks, USB drives, CDs, and DVDs) are all susceptible to the same environmental risks as physical records (heat/cold, water damage, mold, fire, etc.), but they are also subject to the additional risks due to the ephemeral nature of digital files.

Folder and File Organization

Consider this: where are your electronic documents and digital photos kept? Are they all saved in one place, or are they spread out over many devices and storage locations? Maybe some of them are on your phone, some on your laptop, some you remember burning to a CD a few years ago, and some more are saved on external hard drives or in the cloud. Are some of your favorite family photos only found on Facebook or other socialmedia? Does your family know where to find these important family documents and photos, or does only one person have access to them?

Much like good paper record-keeping, one of the most important components of good electronic records preservation is proper organization. The first step is to identify where your digital photos, videos and documents are saved. Then delete unwanted, irrelevant or redundant files, and consider organizing how the files are saved so you can see all of the materials together. Arrange those photos and documents into organized folders, and label them in a way that tells you what each folder contains before you open it. Good names for folders and files include descriptive information such as the type of document and what year it is from, or the events and names of people shown in photos and when they were taken. Don’t trust it to be obvious whether a document is important to keep or can be safely deleted. Not everyone will remember when or where a photograph was taken, or of whom. You might recognize your great-aunt from the old baby photos you scanned a few years ago, but another family member might not know their significance. And make sure to save copies of photos posted to social media – don’t rely on a social media site to preserve them!

Once your files are organized, the next step is to make sure they’re saved in a way that helps secure them against loss.

Digital Storage Considerations

When it comes to your important digital records, your storage needs can grow quickly.  You want digital storage that meets your capacity needs, will last, is easily accessible but secure from outside threats, and fits your budget.  The main solution options generally boil down to a) a local, external hard drive that connects to your computer by USB or other connection, or b) online-based cloud storage you access through the internet.  Both options have their pros and cons.

External hard drives are physical storage media that connect to your computer by USB port.  They offer quick access to your documents and photos from your computer, can be configured to automatically back up files saved on them, are safe from hackers, and can be purchased in ample storage unit sizes (500GB-2TB+).  They are, however, susceptible to local risks such as fire, water damage, and theft, are only accessible from a single location unless disconnected and moved, and moving them puts them at risk of physical damage. Even the best external hard drives have a shelf-life of approximately three to ten years before they are at risk of spontaneous failure.  They generally have a linear pricing structure, and could cost you approximately $0.10-$0.50 per GB, depending on the quality of the hard drive.

Cloud storage uploads your documents and photos to off-site storage through the internet rather than saving them on a physical drive connected to your computer.  Cloud storage is accessed online by logging into your account with the cloud storage site, accessible wherever you go so long as you have an internet connection.  With cloud storage, your records are kept safe from local threats of fire, water damage, and theft, and are easily shareable.  However, using cloud storage does come with risks.  You have less control over your materials with cloud storage as they are stored off-site, and you may not know exactly how secure the cloud’s servers really are.  Your records could be vulnerable to hackers, access can be slower than with external hard drives, and the access restrictions could leave your family records inaccessible if only one person has the username and password information for the account. Cloud-based storage also involves on-going costs that have to be paid periodically to continue having access to that storage; if prices rise past what you feel you can pay, you may be left with having to find an alternative storage solution in a hurry. Depending on the amount of storage you need and the features offered by the storage service – file encryption, multiple restore points, geographically-dispersed servers – costs could range anywhere from pennies to $5+ per GB of storage.  Some cloud storage options like Dropbox and Microsoft OneDrive come with a limited amount of free storage, so if you do not have a need for a greater amount of storage, these free options might be a good choice. 

We generally advocate for a hybrid solution: a physical hard-drive for your main storage needs, with back-up copies saved to the cloud. If something happens to one, you will still have access to the other, and will not have lost anything. 

Backing Up Your Files

In the archives and library world, we have a saying: Lots of copies keep stuff safe.  Creating back-up copies of your important files can help protect them from loss in case something goes wrong.  And there is a lot that can go wrong.  Natural disasters like floods, fires, hurricanes and tornadoes aren’t the only threats to be aware of; system or hardware failure, file corruption, malware, viruses, theft, and human error are also great risks to the security and preservation of your family records and photos.  Backing up your files is a good way to make sure that even if something happens to your files in one location, you won’t lose the only copy of those precious family materials.  There are some key things to remember about backing up your files:

·         Back up your files regularly – either on a set schedule or whenever you’ve made a major   change or addition to them.
·         Burning your files to a CD or DVD isn’t ideal for keeping new files and photos backed   up. CDs get lost or damaged, and newer computers are less likely to have CD drives.
·         Some external hard drives and cloud storage options can be configured to automatically   back-up files. Consider setting a back-up to automatically run in the middle of the night.
·         There are three main categories of back-ups:  Full back-ups, which completely copy all   of  the data being backed up each time; Differential back-ups, which build on an initial   full back-up, and only copy data added since that original back-up; and Incremental   back-ups, which also build upon an initial full back-up, but only copy data added since   the last incremental back-up.
·         Don’t store original files and back-up copies together – if your back-up hard drive is kept   next to your laptop, a fire, tornado, or thief can easily get both.  Consider the hybrid USB   hard-drive/cloud storage solution we suggested yesterday. Geographically-separate back-   ups can be good insurance against most forms of data loss.
·         A widely-used data-loss prevention strategy is the 3-2-1 Plan, which involves having   three copies of your important files: two stored locally but on different media (perhaps   one on your computer and one on an external hard drive), and one stored off-site, in   cloud storage.

File Migration

One of the most overlooked aspects to digital archiving is ensuring continued access. Scanning a paper document or photograph isn’t a preservation solution, but trading the set of physical preservation concerns for a different – and arguably more difficult – set of preservation concerns.  Whereas well-stored photographs and paper documents created a hundred and fifty years ago might be easily readable today, digital records created today may be inaccessible in a decade or two if not cared for properly. 

You see, digital records require much more active preservation than paper records and photographs. Not only do storage media tend to fail (including CDs and DVDs labeled "archival quality"), in a few years, the hardware and even the software required to read the content may no longer be available. The file formats in which information is stored change over time, and quickly. New versions of software and file formats are released all the time, and there is a limit to their ability to open older files.  If all of your family tree information is stored in an older file type, soon you may still have the file but no software capable of opening it, or no computer capable of running the software that *could* open it. Digital obsolescence is the main enemy for archives seeking to preserve digital records and photographs, and can cause the loss of personal digital records if steps aren’t taken to keep your important family files up-to-date.

The answer is file migration. Essentially, opening your older digital files and saving them into a different, newer file type.  In a specific example, if you have an older document from Microsoft Word (a file ending in .doc) you would open it and save it as a new Word document (.docx) to prevent losing access to it as newer versions of Microsoft Word are released. So double-check your important digital records and photos to find what formats they are saved as, and migrate them into newer file types to prevent losing access to them through digital obsolescence.  Though remember, digital obsolescence is an ongoing preservation concern when it comes to digital files, and you will need to periodically check and migrate older file types forward every few years to keep up with technology as it changes.

We hope this electronic records care post have been interesting and helpful to you in taking care of your family's important electronic records and digital photographs. Remember that the Arkansas State Archives is YOUR state archives, and we are here to be a resource for you and answer questions you might have about preserving your records. 





Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Electronic Records Care: Digital Storage Considerations

In yesterday’s Electronic Records Care on Facebook, we talked about organizing your files of important family records and digital photographs. Now we want to talk about where these files are stored. When it comes to your important digital records, your storage needs can grow quickly.  You want digital storage that meets your capacity needs, will last, is easily accessible but secure from outside threats, and fits your budget.  The main solution options generally boil down to a) a local, external hard drive that connects to your computer by USB or other connection, or b) online-based cloud storage you access through the internet.  Both options have their pros and cons.

External hard drives are physical storage media that connect to your computer by USB port.  They offer quick access to your documents and photos from your computer, can be configured to automatically back up files saved on them, are safe from hackers, and can be purchased in ample storage unit sizes (500GB-2TB+).  They are, however, susceptible to local risks such as fire, water damage, and theft, are only accessible from a single location unless disconnected and moved, and moving them puts them at risk of physical damage. Even the best external hard drives have a shelf-life of approximately three to ten years before they are at risk of spontaneous failure.  They generally have a linear pricing structure, and could cost you approximately $0.10-$0.50 per GB, depending on the quality of the hard drive.

Cloud storage uploads your documents and photos to off-site storage through the internet rather than saving them on a physical drive connected to your computer.  Cloud storage is accessed online by logging into your account with the cloud storage site, accessible wherever you go so long as you have an internet connection.  With cloud storage, your records are kept safe from local threats of fire, water damage, and theft, and are easily shareable.  However, using cloud storage does come with risks.  You have less control over your materials with cloud storage as they are stored off-site, and you may not know exactly how secure the cloud’s servers really are.  Your records could be vulnerable to hackers, access can be slower than with external hard drives, and the access restrictions could leave your family records inaccessible if only one person has the username and password information for the account. Cloud-based storage also involves on-going costs that have to be paid periodically to continue having access to that storage; if prices rise past what you feel you can pay, you may be left with having to find an alternative storage solution in a hurry. Depending on the amount of storage you need and the features offered by the storage service – file encryption, multiple restore points, geographically-dispersed servers – costs could range anywhere from pennies to $5+ per GB of storage.  Some cloud storage options like Dropbox and Microsoft OneDrive come with a limited amount of free storage, so if you do not have a need for a greater amount of storage, these free options might be a good choice. 

We generally advocate for a hybrid solution: a physical hard-drive for your main storage needs, with back-up copies saved to the cloud. If something happens to one, you will still have access to the other, and will not have lost anything. We will talk more about this tomorrow, when we consider questions about backing up your digital files.



Wednesday's Wonderful Collection - Utley family papers, MS.000160

Joseph Simeon Utley was born October 18, 1876, at Greenbrier, Arkansas, the son of Francis David and Amanda Melvina Snow Utley. J.S. Utley obtained a Bachelor of Arts from Hendrix College in 1906, and was admitted to the Arkansas bar and started his private law practice in 1907. In 1903, he married Vivian Rockwood Williams, who was born October 15, 1877. Their children were Don Williams, born February 18, 1905; Georgia Fentem, born January 28, 1907; and Ruth Beale, who was born May 18 1911. Vivian Utley died December 4, 1942. Joseph Simeon Utley died December 13, 1943.

This collection consists of short stories, plays, poetry, block prints, and other artwork by Vivian Williams Utley and her daughters, Georgia Fentem Utley and Ruth Beale Utley. There is also correspondence, newspapers, photographs, books, publications, and miscellaneous material and artifacts related to J.S. Utley and other members of his family.

·         Manuscripts
o    1. "Famous Paintings" (Box 1)
o    2. "Amazon River and Birds There"
o    3. "Against the Law" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    4. "Always Follow Through" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    5. "The Antiquary" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    6. "Beyond the Hills" a play by Vivian Williams Utley
o    7. "Beyond the Hills" a play by Vivian Williams Utley
o    8. "Beyond the HIlls" a play by Vivian Williams Utley
o    9. "Beyond the Hills," Chapter XXV, by Vivian Williams Utley
o    10. "Blockadin'" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    11. "Bootleg Trapper" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    12. "Buffalo River Justice" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    13. "Chased by a Panther" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    14. "Contentment" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    15. "The Cry in the Night"
o    16. "Crystal River Monster" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    17. "The Daily Prayer of a Physician"
o    18. "Family Reunion" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    19. "First Negative"
o    20. "From Miner to Musician" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    21. "Girl Born and Reared in Lithuania, Now a Useful and Appreciative Citizen" by Vivian Williams Utley (Box 2)
o    22. "History of Block Painting" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    23. "Home," anonymous, with World War I newsclippings
o    24. "Homesteaders" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    25. "Hound Dog Trial" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    26. "In Manless Land" a Comedy in Two Acts by Vivian Williams Utley
o    27. "In Manless Land" A Comedy in Two Acts by Vivian Williams Utley
o    28. "In Manless Land" A Comedy in Two Acts by Vivian Williams Utley
o    29. "In Manless Land" A Comedy in Two Acts by Vivian Williams Utley
o    30. "In Manless Land" A Comedy in Two Acts by Vivian Williams Utley
o    31."In Manless Land" a play by Vivian Williams Utley
o    32. "Libraries of Babylon" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    33. "Little Green Box" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    34. "Moonshiners of the Mountains"
o    35. "Patience on the Recoil" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    36. "Pineapple Bedstead Story"
o    37. "The Plot"
o    38. "Plunkett, the Gentleman for Clayton" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    39. "Promissory Note"
o    40. "Red Ribbon On Her Hair" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    41. "Sorghum Making Time in the Hills" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    42. "Strange Will" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    43. "Them Hills Air Blue" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    44. "Uncle Sam Lady" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    45. "Viewpoints" by Chet C. Allard
o    46. "We See New Orleans" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    47. "What Do You Consider the Most Vital Defense Problem of This Community"
o    48. "Whisperings of Nature" by Vivian Williams Utley
·         Correspondence
o    49. 1918 April 2: J.S. Utley, Atlanta, Georgia, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S. Utley) Benton, Arkansas (Box 3)
o    50. 1918 May 3: J.S. Utley, Atlanta, Georgia, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S.) Utley, Benton, Arkansas
o    51. 1918 May 9: J.S. Utley, Atlanta, Georgia, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S.) Utley, Benton, Arkansas
o    52. 1918 May 15: J.S. Utley, Atlanta, Georgia, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S.) Utley, Benton, Arkansas
o    53. 1918 May 15: J.S. Utley, Atlanta, Georgia, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S.) Utley, Benton, Arkansas
o    54. 1918 May 19: J.S. Utley, Atlanta, Georgia, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S.) Utley, Benton, Arkansas
o    55. 1918 May 20: J.S. Utley, Atlanta, Georgia, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S.) Utley, Benton, Arkansas
o    56. 1923 November 23: J.S. Utley, New York, New York, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S.) Utley
o    57. 1927 July 17: Georgia Fentem Utley, Conway, Arkansas, to Ruth Beale Utley, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    58. 1929 July 5: F. Firton, Moselle, France, to Ruth Utley, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    59. 1930 August 2: F. Firton, Moselle, France, to Ruth Utley, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    60. 1933 June 18: Arkansas Democrat, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Ruth Utley, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    61. 1935 February 9: Arkansas Democrat, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Ruth Utley, Texarkana, Arkansas
o    62. 1937 May 19: Frances Rule, United Feature Syndicate, New York, New York, to Ruth Utley,
o    63. 1937 May 20: Charles O. Gorham, McClure Newspaper Syndicate, New York, New York, to Ruth Utley
o    64. 1939 March 17: Troy W. Lewis, American Caxton Society Press, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Ruth Utley
o    65. 1939 June 8: Richard K. Abbot, Writer's Digest, Cincinnati, Ohio, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S.) Utley, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    66. 1941 October 27: Daniel Ryerson, New York, New York, to Vivian Utley, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    67. 1942 January 23: Charles A. Pearce, Duell, Sloan and Pearce, Incorporated, Publishers, New York, New York, to Vivian Utley, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    68. 1942 February 24: Gordon Gipson, Treasurer, The Caxton Printers, Limited, Caldwell, Idaho, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S.) Utley, Little Rock, Arkansas
o    69. 1942 April 22: Vivian Utley, Little Rock, Arkansas, to C. Colchan, New York, New York
o    70. 1943 April 23: Vivian Utley, Little Rock, Arkansas, to C. Colchan, New York, New York
o    Undated correspondence
§  71. Jack Woodford, Hollywood, California, to Vivian (Mrs. J.S.) Utley
§  72. Christmas card with notes for a story
§  73. John Patrick Lally
§  74. Mother, to Ruth
§  75. Omar, to Precious
§  76. Betty, to Daddy and Miss Ruth, Mother
o    Letters with manuscripts
§  77. 1911 March 10: "A Drink of Water"
§  78. 1932 July 8: Vases
§  79. 1938 August 18: Lakes
§  80. 1941 March 3: "Bootleg Trapper," by Vivian Williams Utley
§  81. 1941 June 18: "Love's Short Wave Radio"
§  82. Undated: "Asleep on the Hay"
§  83. Undated: "Crystal River Monster"
§  84. Undated: About a dog
§  85. Undated: "Smoke in Their Eyes" by Vivian Williams Utley
·         Block prints by Vivian Williams Utley
o    86. Metal plate (Box 4)
o    87. "Along the River Road"
o    88. Arkansas capitol
o    89. Arkansas mill
o    90. Arkansas watermill, 1930
o    91. Buttermilk Falls, Caddo Gap, Arkansas
o    92. Christmas cards
o    93. First post before 1770, Arkansas City, Arkansas
o    94. Highway bridge at Sylamore, Arkansas
o    95. In the heart of the Ozarks
o    96. The Main Street Bridge from North Little Rock, Arkansas
o    97. Mill
o    98. Mill in blue
o    99. Mountain with lake
o    100. My first dry point
o    101. New Orleans
o    102. Old Hartwick Mill near Guy
o    103. Pinnacle Rock, near Harrison, Boone County, Arkansas
o    104. Stream
o    105. "Struggle for LIfe"
o    106. Territorial State House, 1935
o    107. Birdsell water mill
o    108. Crowley's Lake at Crowley's Ridge State Park
o    109. Evening Shade water mill
o    110. The Forest Lake Country Club
o    111. Fruit trees in bloom
o    112. Hills Lake on Galloway Pike near Little Rock, Arkansas
o    113. Mill
o    114. Old State House, two views
o    115. Petit Jean State Park Bridge
o    116. Presbyterian Church, Eighth and Scott
o    117. Rock Island Depot at old Huntersville, North Little Rock
o    118. Sugar Loaf Mountain at Heber Springs, Arkansas
o    119. Waterfall
o    120. Wild geese at Stuttgart, Arkansas, rice fields
o    121. "Beauty Spots," Gazette feature articles
o    122. Oldest water mill in Arkansas, by Annabelle Wolfe
o    123. Miscellaneous
o    124. Miscellaneous
·         Poems
o    125. "In the Spirit of Washington" by Ruth Utley Jones
o    126. "We're the Parents of a Nun"
o    127. "The Heavens Laugh" (1933) by Ruth Utley
o    128. "The Heavens Laugh" Ruth Utley
o    129. "Poems" (1933-1936) by Ruth Utley, published
o    130. Scrapbook of clippings about "Poems" by Ruth Utley
o    131. "Other Poems" (1928-1940) by Ruth Utley, unpublished
o    132. Ruth Utley, unpublished poems
o    133. "Letting Things Come" by Georgia Fentem Utley (Box 5)
o    134. "Fragments" by members of 12A literature, Little Rock High School, 1929 March
o    135. "Fragments" Volume Two, by pupils of senior English classes, Little Rock Senior High School, 1929 December
o    136. "Frank Lebby Stanton" Georgia's first poet laureate, 1938
o    137. Miscellaneous poems
o    138. "Poets' Roundtable of Arkansas," 1942-1943
o    139. "The Poets' Scroll," 1932 July
o    140. "Poets' Roundtable of Arkansas," 1946-1947
·         Published material
o    141. "Crossing the Bar" by Alfred Tennyson
o    142. "Ashes and Sparks" by Georgia Fentam Utley
o    143. Little Rock High School newspaper, "The Tiger" excerpts, Ruth Beale Utley
o    144. "The Tiger," Senior issue, 1925 May 15
o    145. "The Tiger," Little Rock High School 50th Anniversary of Class of 1925
o    146. "The Window," University of Colorado, Spring edition, 1944
o    147. "The Writer," a collection of works by members of the Arkansas Authors' and Composers' Society, 1937-1938
o    148. Article, "We See New Orleans" by Vivian Williams Utley
o    149. Articles, Vivian Williams Utley
o    150. Short stories, Vivian Williams Utley, 1936-1939
o    151. Bible, 1865 (Box 6)
o    152. Bible, undated
o    153. "The Red Letter New Testament," undated
o    154. "A Dictionary of Poetical Quotations," Ward Thomas Y. Crowell and Company, 1883
o    155. "Poems of Trees: A Sidney Lanier Memorial," Volume VIII, compiled and edited by Wightman F. Melton, 1939 (Box 7)
o    156. "Heart Songs: Melodies of Days Gone By," initiated by the National Magazine, 1909
o    157. "Poems of Trees: A Sidney Lanier Memorial," Volume VI, compiled and edited by Wightman F. Welton, 1937 (Box 8)
o    158. "Denslow's Night Before Christmas" by Clement C. Moore, 1902
o    159. "Beyond the Hills," a novel by Ruth Williams Utley, bound typescript, 1940
o    160. "The Scrapbook of Arkansas Literature: An Anthology for the General Reader," edited by Octavius Coke, 1939 (two copies) (Box 9)
o    161. 1937 March 25: "Benton Courier," Centennial number (Box 10)
o    162. "Arkansas Gazette Magazine," featured articles, 1937-1939, "Arkansas Beauty Spots in Wood Block," text and illustrations by Vivian Williams Utley
o    163. Undated: "Arkansas Gazette Sunday Magazine," page 5-6; 11-12, "Old Hankins Water Mill," and "Streamlining the Chatter"
o    164. 1918 November 11: "Arkansas Democrat," fragmented
o    165. 1935 newspaper article: "Authors and Composers to Open Season," photo of Vivian Williams Utley, president
o    166. 1936 April 30: "Arkansas Methodist," poem "In the April Long Ago" by Ruth Utley, pages 3-4
o    167. 1938 November 6: "Arkansas Gazette Sunday Magazine Section," "Early North Arkansas Settlers," pages 1-2; 15-16
o    168. 1966 March 6: "Arkansas Gazette," Alice Smith's 100th birthday, pages 23A-24A
o    169. 1966 March 7: "Arkansas Democrat," Alice Smith's 100th birthday, page 3
o    170. Undated: Benton, Arkansas, newspaper, "The Alamo and the Storm," a short story by Vivian Williams Utley
o    171. 1940 June 17: "Arkansas Democrat," extra, "France Gives Up"
o    172. 1971, newsclippings
o    173. 1940 October 13: Letter, Henry Orbach, KARK radio, to Mrs. J.S. Utley, with articles from "The Milwaukee Journal" (Box 11)
o    174. 1943 September 8: Arkansas Democrat," pages 1-2
o    175. 1944 June 6: "Arkansas Gazette"
o    176. 1945 May 4: "Arkansas Democrat," pages 1-10
o    177. 1945 May 5: "Arkansas Democrat"
o    178. 1945 May 6: "Arkansas Democrat," section A
o    179. 1945 May 7: "Arkansas Democrat"
o    180. 1945 May 8: "Arkansas Democrat"
o    181. 1945 May 9: "Arkansas Democrat," pages 1-2 and 13-14
o    182. 1945 August 10: "Arkansas Democrat"
o    183. 1945 August 15: "Arkansas Gazette"
o    184. 1969 July 21: "Arkansas Gazette," pages 1A-16A
o    185. 1969 July 25: "Arkansas Gazette," pages 1A-20A
o    186. 1969 November 16: "Arkansas Gazette," pages 1-2
o    187. 1969 November 20: "Arkansas Gazette," pages 1A-2A and 19A-20A
o    188. 1969 November 25: "Arkansas Gazette," pages 1A-2A; 19A-20A
o    189. 1974 August 9: "Arkansas Gazette," pages 1A-30A
·         Yearbooks
o    190. 1926 yearbook, "The Scroll," Arkansas State Teachers' College, Conway, Arkansas (Box 12)
o    191. 1927 yearbook, "The Scroll," Arkansas State Teachers' College, Conway , Arkansas
o    192. 1930 yearbook, "The Scroll," Arkansas State Teachers' College, Conway , Arkansas
o    193. 1931 yearbook, "The Scroll," Arkansas State Teachers' College, Conway, Arkansas
o    194. 1927 December 7: "The Tiger," Little Rock High School (Box 13)
o    195. 1928 May 17: "The Tiger," Little Rock High School
o    196. 1928 April 25: "The Tiger," Little Rock High School
o    197. 1929: "The Tiger," Little Rock High School, 1929 Seniors
·         Unpublished materials
o    198. "Stunt Book", scrapbook of photographs and memorabilia of Ruth Beale Utley
o    199. 1940 April 26: Phonograph record, "An Orchid for J.S. Utley," with correspondence from G.C. Moses, Moses Melody Shop, Little Rock, Arkansas, to Judge J.S. Utley
o    200. Undated: Picture scrapbook of New Orleans, Chicago, San Francisco
o    201. Cloth baby shirt
o    202. 1927: Watercolor of a river and a bridge, by Vivian Williams Utley
o    203. 1943 June: Diploma, Joseph Simeon Utley, Hendrix College
o    204. Autograph book, Ruth Utley, 1926 (Box 14)
o    205. Autograph book, Vivian Williams, 1890-1893
o    206. Undated: Devil's Den State Park, Arkansas, materials
o    207. Manuscript, "Betty," by a small child
o    208. Photograph scrapbook, Mrs. J.S. Utley
o    209. 1943 December 13: Resolution concerning the death of Joseph Simeon Utley
o    210. Valedictory address delivered, 1849
o    211. 1942 December 5: Registers and memory book (with family record) on Vivian Williams Utley, from her funeral
o    212. Undated painting of a woman with two children, anonymous
o    213. Undated: Handwritten notes and short story
o    214. Miscellaneous
o    215. Miscellaneous

o    216. Miscellaneous