Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Wednesday’s Wonderful Collection - Lycurgus A. Sallee papers, MS.000856

Lycurgus A. Sallee was born in St. Charles County, Missouri, on March 19, 1829, to Isaac Huffman and Lucinda Baugh Sallee. Lycurgus joined the Confederate Army in Camden, Arkansas, in May of 1861. He served in Company C, First Arkansas Regiment, as a private. After the Civil War, he left Arkansas, later living in Colorado and Texas. He died in Hot Springs, Arkansas, on November 29, 1916, but is buried in Westlawn Cemetery, Del Rio, Texas.
This collection contains correspondence, a scrapbook, and items from the Civil War and 1911 Confederate Veterans Reunion in Little Rock, Arkansas. This correspondence details the Battle of Chickamauga on the 19th and 20th of September 1862 and the Battle of Stones River fought on December 31, 1862, in Tennessee.
·         "The Daily Citizen," Vicksburg, Mississippi (photocopy) 1863 July 2 (Box 1)
·         Correspondence
o    Lycurgus A. Sallee, Johnson County, North Carolina, to James J. Lawrence 1865 April 2 (Box 1)
o    Envelope, Walter L. Bragg, Alabama, to L.A. Sallee, Army of Tennessee 1860 November 18 (Box 1)
o    M.M. Duffie, Winnipeg, Canada, to "Dear Old Friend" 1898 February 27 (Box 1)
o    Robert L. Rodgers, Atlanta, Georgia, to L.A. Sallee, Apishapa, Colorado 1898 March 19 (Box 1)
o    Lycurgus A. Sallee, Del Rio, Texas, to Mamie Yeovy, M'Gregor, Texas 1910 May 2 (Box 1)
o    Lycurgus Ashbrook Sallee, Del Rio, Texas, to J.A. Reeves, Camden, Arkansas 1910 February 26 (Box 1)
o    Charles W. Bryan, Lincoln, Nebraska, to L.A. "Salles," Del Rio, Texas 1912 April 26 (Box 1)
o    George A. Proctor to unknown Undated (Box 1)
o    Bennett H. Young, Louisville, Kentucky, to "Dear Friend" Undated (Box 1)
·         Booklet: "Fifty Best Poems of America" 1937 (Box 1)
·         Pamphlet: United Confederate Veterans Reunion, Little Rock, Arkansas 1911 May 16-18 (Box 1)
·         Scrapbook 1891-1913 (Box 2)

Thursday, June 28, 2018

SARA Helps Preserve Pike County History



Named for American explorer Zebulon Pike, Pike County was created by the territorial legislature on November 1, 1833 from Clark and Hempstead Counties. It was not until 1836 that a permanent county seat was chosen when Murfreesborough (later changed to Murfreesboro) was established along with a post office. 

The town is said to have been named by settlers who came from the town of the same name in Tennessee.  Due to two courthouse fires, most of Pike County’s early records are unavailable prior to 1895, thus making much of Pike County’s early history difficult to research. However, a ledger of the County Treasurer’s records that dates to 1884 survived the fires and has been preserved in SARA’s collections. 

These records, which list county income and expenses, give a rare glimpse into Pike County history.  The columns record what was available in the treasury in currency, state scrip and county scrip. It also lists poll taxes collected and fees for teacher’s licenses, as well as payments for public school teacher’s salaries. With so much of Pike County’s early history lost, having such a record available is of great value to researchers.

SARA Welcomes Summer Intern




Wes Oliver, a rising senior at Ouachita Baptist University (OBU), has joined the team at Southwest Arkansas Regional Archives (SARA) as its summer intern. Oliver, who is double majoring in history and public history, and minoring in psychology, became familiar with SARA while touring with Dr. Wendy Richter’s Archival Studies course in December of 2017. Oliver became interested in the internship at SARA because he wanted to learn more about the work, but also to see if archiving is something that he would like to pursue as a career.

Oliver has kept busy with a variety of projects, which has given him an understanding of the work archivists do. A project that he has worked on is helping to organize over 400 courthouse ledgers on the custom ledger shelving that was installed at SARA earlier this year.  He is also helping with processing a collection of historical information on schools in southwest Arkansas which was compiled by former SARA Director Faith Riley.  

One project in particular that Oliver has enjoyed is working on processing the unclaimed Hempstead County marriage licenses that were donated to SARA by former Archival Manager Peggy Lloyd. “Every preacher or justice of the peace had his own style of writing the records so that you could get a sense of the individuality of the people involved and some of the characteristics of the church denominations and local government institutions they represented,” said Oliver.

In his spare time, he enjoys reading (especially about history), walking his dog and exploring the outdoors.

The SARA Foundation sponsors the internship each year, and is the friends group for SARA. 

SARA Foundation’s mission includes providing volunteer support, promoting the acquisition of archival materials for SARA, and conducting special projects and fundraisers benefitting SARA. The SARA Foundation depends on membership dues and other contributions to fulfill its mission.  For more information, e-mail waterslu@swarchives.org, call 870-983-2633, or write to SARA Foundation, Inc., P.O. Box 133, Washington, AR 71862.



Wednesday, June 27, 2018

The Black History Commission of Arkansas and ASA Host Workshop



The Black History Commission of Arkansas (BHCA) and the Arkansas State Archives (ASA) hosted their annual workshop on Saturday, June 9, at the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center in Little Rock.

The event, “Arkansas’s Early Black Fraternal Organizations,” featured five dynamic speakers, who focused on multiple historical perspectives and unique characteristics of African American fraternal organizations in Arkansas.

Dr. John Graves, professor of history at Henderson State University, was the first speaker. He discussed the national history of the Mosaic Templars. Dr. Blake Wintory, assistant director at Lakeport Plantation, spoke on the history of Arkansas’s black fraternal organizations. Cleveland K. Wilson, grand master of the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge, talked about the history of the Masons, and Flora Simon, grand matron of the Eastern Star, discussed the history of her organization.

Tamela Tenpenny-Lewis wrapped up the day with a presentation about gravestones and the symbols that can be found on them. “There are countless stories hidden within the pages of the histories of the African American benevolent societies,” said Tenpenny-Lewis. “They speak to us from thousands of headstones in countless burial grounds. Some stand mightily in our midst today. Our awesome task is to find them.”


June 2018 Accessions

ASA:

Arkansas state song sheet music
Hope Star centennial newspaper

Printed Materials

“The Pix” Little Rock High School yearbook, 1952
Crossett High School yearbook, 1953
1924 Western Arkansas League
The Baptist Encyclopedia, V. I & II

SARA:

Hempstead County loose marriage records

NEARA:


Barbara Wright Brodie Collection accretion, AN2018.0002B


Book list from this collection:
Descendants of Richard and Elizabeth (Ewen) Talbott of Poplar Knowle West River, Anne Arundel County Maryland, Compiled by Ida Morrison (Murphy) Shirk
To Maryland from Overseas, by Harry Wright Newman
 Davidson County, Tennessee County Court Minutes, 1783-1792, by Carol Wells
Cemetery Records of Lawrence County Arkansas, by Extension Homemakers Council Marriages Lawrence County Arkansas, Volume II, 1883-1902
Lawrence County Arkansas Tax Records, 1829-1838, by Burton Ray Knotts
 Abstracts of Arkansas Reports, January 1837 - January 1861, compiled by Joan Thurman Taunton
New Hope Baptist Church Records, 1844-1926
Obituaries from Tennessee Newspapers, by Jill L. Garrett
Davidson County, Tenneessee Deed Books, "T" and "W," 1829-1835, by Mary Sue Smith
The Cemeteries of Hyattstown, by Dona Lou Cuttler
The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland, by J.D. Warfield

Periodicals

“The Greene County Historical and Genealogical Society Quarterly,” Volume 31, Summer 2018.
 
“The Independence County Library Genealogy Newsletter,” No. 24, June 2018
“Green County Historical and Genealogical Society Newsletter,” Vol. 31, Issue 2, May-June 2018.


Wednesdays Wonderful Collection - Sarah Rhodes Diaries, MS.000796

Sarah Starr was born December 30, 1848, and married Cory Rhodes October 20, 1866. They had six children, although only two survived to adulthood (Milton and Frances). By 1890, the Rhodes were living in Clarksville, Arkansas, and Cory was teaching Sunday School.
This collection contains the diaries of Sarah Starr Rhodes, which describe her day-to-day activities at home, the death of her father, and the birth of her last child, Frances. The establishment of Cumberland College in Clarksville, Arkansas, is frequently mentioned.
·         Diary 1890

·         Diary 1891

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

NEARA Document Details Lawsuit with Former Arkansas Governor



In early Arkansas, penal bonds were commonly posted for a variety of court-related functions. County officials, for example, had to post bonds swearing to uphold their office or forfeit the specified amount of money. Likewise, citizens who were fulfilling court obligations like the administrators of an estate also had to post a bond. These bonds were sworn to the Governor of Arkansas starting in 1819 with establishment of the Arkansas Territory. The practice continued once Arkansas reached statehood on June 15, 1836.

While it was rare, occasionally legal action was taken to make the individuals who posted a penal bond forfeit their payment. To do so, someone would have to allege that the bonded person did not fulfill the duties of the bond.

One such case occurred with the estate of Isaac Knighten in 1846. His heirs contested that the administrators failed in their duties, which prompted a lawsuit from the Governor of Arkansas against the administrators. In this case, a lawyer on behalf of Gov. Thomas Drew alleged that the administrators failed to adequately execute the estate on behalf of the minor heirs (children under the age of 21). Because of their failure, Gov. Drew demanded the administrators pay the full penal sum of $1600.

The case goes on to distribute the Knighten estate appropriately. In what may seem an ordinary document, the early history of Arkansas is captured and saved for Arkansans to discover 182 years later.

Authentic Arkansas: Mr. Clean Stars in Made-in-Arkansas Movie




Authentic Arkansas is a series written by the staff of the Arkansas State Archives that explores the state’s cultural heritage through unique documents and artifacts.

Arkansas isn’t known as a mecca for the film industry, but the state has produced a number of stars throughout its history: Billy Bob Thornton, Mary Steenburgen and Alan Ladd, to name a few, and has been the location for the filming of several movies, including “Mud,” “A Face in the Crowd,” “A Painted House,” “The Blue and the Gray” and “White Lightning.”

Arkansas also served as the location for a lesser-known western, “The Terror at Black Falls.” Richard Sarafian brought his self-penned western film to Arkansas in 1959. Sarafian had only worked in the industry for a few years, mostly as a television director, but he wanted to make a movie about vengeance in the Old West. His story focused on a young man who was lynched for horse theft, the subsequent revenge by the young man’s father, played by Peter Makamos, and the father’s demands to meet the town’s sheriff, played by House Peters.

Sarafian’s production company, Meridian Productions, had scouted the country for a suitable place that could double as the Old West, searching the Midwest and upper South until finally settling on the small town of Scotland in north-central Arkansas.

Scotland had a population of only 150 with a downtown area that, with some changes, could pass for a western town, so at the end of May 1959, film crews began the town’s transformation. All modern touches were hidden, gasoline pumps removed, and asbestos siding replaced with clapboard siding. The crew even brought in hay stacks to drape over modern appliances that could not be as easily removed and workers hung old-fashioned signs around town to add a little authenticity. 

Although cast and crew hoped the movie would be a smash hit when it was released in 1962, it had a short run and few people saw it. Eventually, the film was lost and the copyright expired. Luckily, film historians discovered the movie and restored the film. Today it can be watched online at http://www.westernmania.com/watch.php?id=38#.WxgaYSBOmUk.

While none of the actors are widely known, Peters would become known for his face, if not for his name. The year before filming began on the movie, Peters’ agent asked him if he would like to become a pitchman in commercials. Peters wasn’t sure about doing it, but with the promise of an easy $100, he shaved his head and donned a golden earring. From that moment on, Peters was a magic genie named Mr. Clean, and would be known as such until his death in 2008.

Before Peters died, he had a long running correspondence with Scotland historian, Mary Jean Hall. Through their years of communication, he sent her material from the film and his career, including scripts, posters, stills and other memorabilia. Hall donated the material to the Arkansas State Archives (ASA) in 2017. The artifacts are a treasure trove for those who wish to study film production as the collection offers a rare glimpse of behind-the-scenes film-making.

A portion of these items can be viewed in a mini-exhibit in ASA’s lobby, Monday-Saturday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Wednesday’s Wonderful Collection - George F. Upton Photograph Collection, MS.000841

George Flint Upton was born on September 3rd, 1878, in Lawrence, Kansas. It is not known exactly when Upton and his wife, Janelle Lemoyne Upton, moved to Dardanelle, Arkansas, but Upton took a job as a printer at the Dardanelle Post-Dispatch sometime in the 1890s. He became owner and publisher of the paper in 1900. According to the obituary published following his death on November 7th, 1967, Upton had served as mayor of Dardanelle for two years, served on the school board for 12 years, and served as president of the local Chamber of Commerce for several years. The Uptons had three sons: Eldridge, George Jr., and Robert. George Jr. served as the associate editor of the Post-Dispatch for 25 years, and served in World War II. George Upton Jr. died on June 18, 1967.
This collection contains photographs, postcards, printed ephemera, and one artifact relating to George F. Upton of Dardanelle, Arkansas.
·         Photos 1-3 1928-1934 (Box 1)
o    PH.Upton.01: “Mt. Nebo, July 21st, 1934,” black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½"
o    PH.Upton.02: “Fred Collier on left, Jack Herman on right, June 7, 1928,” black and white photograph, 2½" x 3 ½"
o    PH.Upton.03: Lookout tower, “June 7, 1928,” black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½"
·         Photos 4-7
o    PH.Upton.04: “Geo. F. Upton Jr.,” black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.05: “Eldridge Upton,” black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.06: Unidentified Upton, black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.07: Unidentified Upton, black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½" undated
·         Photos 8-10
o    PH.Upton.08: Unidentified Upton in ranger garb in front of tent, black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.09: Unidentified Upton, on deck, black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.10: Unidentified Upton in suit in front of tent, black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½" undated
·         Photos 11-12
o    PH.Upton.11: “Hot Springs, June 7, 1920,” driveway and pagoda, black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½"
o    PH.Upton.12: “Hot Springs, June 7, 1920,” pond and pool house, black and white photograph, 2 ½" x 3 ½"
·         Photos 13-15
o    PH.Upton.13: “The Booth’s place, 4/16/27,” black and white photograph, 3" x 5"
o    PH.Upton.14: “North Dardanelles, 4/16/27,” black and white photograph, 3" x 5"
o    PH.Upton.15: “Refugees landed on Pope County shore from Reed’s Ferry, 4/16/27,” black and white photo, 3" x 5"
·         Photos 16-18
o    PH.Upton.16: “String Town, April 16, 1927 (Jack Shepherd’s Barn)” black and white photograph, 3" x 5"
o    PH.Upton.17: “Fowler, taken from near Reed’s Ferry. 4/16/27” black and white photograph, 3 x 5"
o    PH.Upton.18: “North Dardanelle, 4/16/27” black and white photograph, 3" x 5"
·         Photos 19-22
o    PH.Upton.19: “Refugees at Reed’s Ferry. 4/16/27” black and white photograph, 3" x 5"
o    PH.Upton.20: “Upper Wharf Dardanelle, Taken from North Dardanelle. 4/17/27” black and white photograph, 3" x 5"
o    PH.Upton.21: “Sole surviving tower. Record rise of 33 feet. 4/18/27.” black and white photograph, 3" x 5"
o    PH.Upton.22: “Pontoon Bridge incline. Stage 33 feet. 4/18/27” black and white photograph, 3" x 5"
·         Photos 23-25
o    PH.Upton.23: “Me & a tent mate, Nolan Burge, Perry, Ark. He knew Hamm Booker well. E. Upton,” black and white photograph, 4 ½" x 2 ¾" undated
o    PH.Upton.24: “Elridge Upton & Nolan Burge,” black and white photograph, 4 ½" x 2 ¾" undated
o    PH.Upton.25: “Part of gang,” black and white photograph, 4 ½" x 2 ¾" undated
·         Photos 26-28
o    PH.Upton.26: “The Barracks, Headquarters for ‘Bunk Fatigue,’” black and white photograph, 3" x 4 ¾" undated
o    PH.Upton.27: “Old Post-Dispatch Building on northeast corner of Front and Pecan Streets, Dardanelle, Ark.” sepia photograph, 3" x 4" 1904
o    PH.Upton.28: Family in Model T in front of “Jude Compton’s home at Wing, Ark.” sepia photograph, 4 ¼" x 3 1/3" undated
·         Photos 29-30
o    PH.Upton.29: “Construction crew of Linebarger & Fraser Contractors of Siloam Springs, Ark., and builders of the U.S. Post Office Building in Dardanelle, Ark." sepia photograph, 5" x 3 ½" 1937
o    PH.Upton.30: “Woods [illegible] Cabin #73-(Present)” black and white photograph, 5" x 3 ½" undated
·         Photos 31-32
o    PH.Upton.31: “Well on Mt. Nebo after Little House Burnt down Mt. [?] on fire Upton’s little House,” black and white photograph, 3" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.32: “Upton House on Mt. Nebo” black and white photograph, 3" x 4 ½" undated
·         Photos 33-35
o    PH.Upton.33: Unidentified woman feeding deer, black and white photograph, 5" x 3 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.34: Landscape with buffalo, black and white photograph, 5" x 3 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.35: Landscape with fox, black and white photograph, 5" x 3 ½" undated
·         Photos 36-39
o    PH.Upton.36: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, group photograph [1 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.37: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, group photograph [2 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.38: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, group photograph [3 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.39: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, group photograph [4 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
·         Photos 40-43
o    PH.Upton.40: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, woman sitting on rock [5 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.41: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, group photograph [5 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.42: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, two women sitting on rock [6 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.43: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, group photograph [7 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
·         Photos 44-47
o    PH.Upton.44: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, group photograph [8 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.45: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, two women sitting on rock [9 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.46: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, group photograph [9 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.47: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, group photograph [10 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
·         Photos 48-49
o    PH.Upton.48: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, group photograph [11 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
o    PH.Upton.49: Q. Society of Mt. Nebo, photograph of rock [12 of 12], sepia photograph, 2 ½" x 4 ½" undated
·         Photos 50-52
o    PH.Upton.50: Dirt road, sepia photograph, 3 ½" x 6" undated
o    PH.Upton.51: Group photograph in front of pavilion, sepia photograph, 3 ½" x 6" undated
o    PH.Upton.52: Group photograph inside pavilion, sepia photograph, 3 ½" x 6" undated
·         Photos 53-54
o    PH.Upton.53: Blevins Hotel (on the Bench), green-tone photograph, 4" x 6" undated
o    PH.Upton.54: New pontoon bridge at Dardanelle, sepia photograph, 5" x 7" 1928
·         Photos 55-57
o    PH.Upton.55: Group photograph in front of city hall, Dardanelle, sepia photograph, 5" x 7" 1931
o    PH.Upton.56: Farmers with bushels of produce, Dardanelle, sepia photograph, 6" x 8" undated
o    PH.Upton.57: “Corn grown on T.A. Johnson Farm near Dardanelle,” sepia photograph, 6" x 8" 1916
·         Photo 58
o    PH.Upton.58: “Herbert Jackson (a Dardanelle boy),” cabinet card, 4" x 6 ½" undated
·         PH.Upton.59: Two photos of Sunset Point in cardboard gatefold, black and white photograph, color photograph, 14" x 9", 1880s or 1890s (L), 1974 (R) 1880-1974 (Box 2)
·         PH.Upton.60: Work site group photo in cardboard gatefold, 12" x 6 ½" undated
·         Postcards 1-3
o    PC.Upton.01: “A trout stream in the Ozarks, near Mt. Nebo, Ark.” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.02: “A trout stream in the Ozarks, near Mt. Nebo, Ark.” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.03: “Mt. Nebo, near Dardanelle, Ark.” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
·         Postcards 4-6
o    PC.Upton.04: “Twin rocks in Arkansas River, Dardanelle, Ark.” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.05: “Dardanelle Rock, Dardanelle, Ark.” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.06: “Entrance to Summit of Dardanelle Rock, Grissom Photo,” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" 1910
·         Postcards 7-9
o    PC.Upton.07: “Cottages on Mt. Nebo, Ark., State Park near Dardanelle, Ark.” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.08: “A Winter Scene Sunset Point, Mt. Nebo, Ark., Grissom Photo,” writing on back, sepia postcard, 3" x 5" 1909
o    PC.Upton.09: “Entrance to Buzzard’s Cave, Mt. Nebo, Ark., Grissom Photo,” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
·         Postcards 10-12
o    PC.Upton.10: “Pavillion on Mt. Nebo, Ark. State Park near Dardanelle; Ark.” black and white postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.11: “Horse Shoe Bend: Mt. Nebo, Ark. Grissom Photo,” black and white gatefold postcard, 6" x 10" undated
o    PC.Upton.12: “Dam No. 1, Mammoth Spring, Arkansas,” black and white postcard, 3" x 5" undated
·         Postcards 13-15
o    PC.Upton.13: “Cove Lake near Mt. Magazine – Sizemore,” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.14: “View from East End Mt. Magazine – Sizemore, Paris, Ark.” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.15: “Air view of Lodge top of Mt. Magazine, Ark. – McCann Photo, Ft. Smith” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
·         Postcards 16-18
o    PC.Upton.16: “On Magazine Mt. Paris Ark.” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.17: “Birds-eye view of Dardanelle, Ark., and river from Dardanelle Rock,” black and white postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.18: “Birds-eye view of Dardanelle, Ark., and river from Dardanelle Rock,” black and white postcard, 3" x 5" undated
·         Postcards 19-21
o    PC.Upton.19: “Birds-eye view of Dardanelle, Ark., and river from Dardanelle Rock,” black and white postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.20: Unidentified camp, sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.21: “Dardanelle Pontoon Bridge, Dardanelle, Ark.” green-tone photograph, 3" x 5" 1910
·         Postcards 22-24
o    PC.Upton.22: “Pontoon Bridge at Dardanelle, Ark.” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.23: First Baptist Church at Dardanelle, sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.24: “Old Courthouse burning in Dardanelle one morning,” black and white postcard, 3" x 5" undated
·         Postcards 25-27
o    PC.Upton.25: “Courthouse, Dardanelle, Ark., Grissom Photo,” black and white postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.26: 2nd Methodist Church of Dardanelle, black and white postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.27: First Presbyterian Church of Dardanelle, black and white postcard, 3" x 5" undated
·         Postcards 28-30
o    PC.Upton.28: Group photo on a boat named “Florence,” sepia postcard, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.29: Photo of bridge under construction, sepia postcard, 3" x 5" 1928
o    PC.Upton.30: Photo of bridge, black and white postcard, 3" x 5" undated
·         Postcards 31-33
o    PC.Upton.31: “Petit Jean Valley from South Rim of Magazine Mtn. – Sizemore Photo,” black and white photograph, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.32: “Main Street Bridge, Little Rock, Arkansas,” black and white photograph, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.33: “Alice Sisty doing Roman jump over auto,” sepia photograph, 3" x 5" undated
·         Postcards 34-36
o    PC.Upton.34: “The Dewey docks herself – Olongapo, P.I.” sepia photograph, 3" x 5" 1936
o    PC.Upton.35: “Buffalo – Yellowstone Park,” black and white photograph, 3" x 5" undated
o    PC.Upton.36: Illustrated postcard with donkeys, 3" x 5" 1907
·         Deed for mineral rights in Logan and Yell County 1961
·         Plat map of the town of Mt. Nebo by Joseph Evins c. 1890
·         Presidential certificate for selective service awarded to George Upton c. 1943
·         Artifacts (Transferred to ASA Three-Dimensional Object Collection)
o    L2018.0003.1 – Glass ashtray with photographic image of the “Longest Pontoon Bridge in the World, Length 2343 ft. Dardanelle, Ark.”
o    L2018.0003.2 – Small card advertising cottages and camping site at Mt. Nebo State Park in Dardanelle, Arkansas, with Coy Hodges listed as the Superintendent.